An Introduction to Commonly Used Acupoints

Written by: Hojun ‘Danny’ Shin, L.AC. + DIPL. O.M. and Danielle Anderson

Commonly Used Acupoints

Many of our clients believe in the wonderful treatment of Acupuncture, but few of them understand how it works before experiencing it for themselves. The treatment is typically referred to as ‘mysterious’ and ‘magical’. Today, our aim is to create clarity and showcase that Acupuncture is a lot less mystical and much more scientific than it initially may seem.

Acupuncture is an ancient technique that aims to heal the body holistically. It is widely used in China, Korea, and Japan, and has become increasingly popular in western medicine. It is a safe modality that makes use of very thin needles to stimulate specific acupoints along the 20 meridians of the body. There are 12 main meridians and 8 secondary meridians, as well as almost 2,000 acupoints that can be stimulated to heal the specific organs and bodily systems that cause the negative symptoms.

We recently launched an Acupuncture series to educate our clients on how Acupuncture works. This series focuses on acupoints that are used to treat the ‘diseased’ channels (also known as meridians) that may be contributing to and/or the cause of common symptoms that we see in patients. By stimulating these acupoints, our Acupuncturist is able to target the root cause of the problem for treatment (versus symptom management) within about 6-8 sessions. Acupuncture is beneficial in all phases of life and is useful at any age–it is something that we encourage all patients to experience routinely as a proactive measure to optimize mind+body health and overall organ function.

Here are the commonly used points that we’ve selected to feature:


Point 1: SP6 - SAN YIN JIAO

SP stands for Spleen, and SP6 is located 3 cun (approximately 2 inches) proximal to the prominence of the medial malleolus, dorsal to the medial crest of the tibia.

This point gets stimulated to influence healing for symptoms, such as:

  • gynecological and obstetric dysfunctions
  • chronic enteritis, chronic diarrhea, abdominal pain/distention
  • dysfunction of male sexual function (ex: nocturnal emission, impotence)
  • dysfunctions of the bladder (ex: urinary retention, uterine bleeding)
  • paralysis and pain of the lower extremities
  • dysmenorrhea, menstrual cramps
  • muscular atrophy, weakness
  • headaches, migraines
  • dizziness, vertigo

SP6 - SAN YIN JIAO


Point 2: LV3 + LR3 - TAI CHONG

SLV stands for Liver, and LV3 is located on the dorsum of the foot, in the depression distal to the proximal corner between the first and second metatarsal bones.

Acupoint LV3 Tai Chong is used for many symptoms like:

  • stress, anxiety
  • hypertension
  • migraines, headaches
  • indigestion, stomach aches
  • vertigo, dizziness
  • sleep disorders
  • sinus congestion
  • ear ringing
  • Bell’s Palsy
  • menstrual cramps, irregular menstruation
  • night sweating
  • pulling sensation in groin to lower quadrant abdomen
  • lower limb aches, weakness
  • epileptic seizures
  • jaundice

LV3 + LR3 - TAI CHONG


Point 3: PC6 - NEI GUAN

Nei Guan is located 2 cun (approximately 1.5 inches) proximal to the distal wrist crease, between the two tendons. PC stands for Pericardium.

This point works to treat the following symptoms:

  • chest pain
  • angina pectoris
  • vomiting, nausea, morning sickness
  • migraines, headaches
  • indigestion, stomach pains
  • vertigo, dizziness
  • wrist pain, carpal tunnel syndrome
  • palpitation

As an experiment on your own, apply pressure and stimulate PC6 (between the two tendons) for 8-10 seconds for 9-10 times a day to reduce severity of your current problem.

PC6 - NEI GUAN


Point 4: BL67 - Zhi Yin

Zhi Yin is located right next to bottom of the pinky toe nail. BL stands for Bladder.

This point influences the symptoms, such as:

  • malposition of fetus (aka breech baby)
  • epistaxis (acute hemorrhage from the nostril, nasal cavity)
  • prolonged labor
  • Hemorrhoids
  • heat and aches in bottom of the feet
  • Hypertension
  • occipital headache
  • pressure around eye
  • excessive tear secretion

BL67 - Zhi Yin


Point 5: ST36 - Zhu San Li

Zhu San Li is located on the lateral side of the leg below the knee (patella) and ST stands for stomach. The point is located about four-finger space below the patella in the depression on the lateral side of the bone (tibia). ST36 is know to boost the immune system of the body and it is used for many symptoms like:

  • Bell’s Palsy
  • indigestion, stomach aches
  • limited range of motion or pain of lower extremities
  • headaches, migraines
  • heat and ache in bottom of the feet
  • mid back pain, tingling
  • sinus congestion
  • nose bleeding
  • ear infection
  • high blood pressure

You can personally use this point as an acupressure point by applying pressure to the point with your fingers for 9-10 seconds, 5-6 times a day.

ST36 - Zhu San Li


Point 6: LI11 - Qu Chi

Zhu San Li is located on the lateral side of the leg below the knee (patella) and ST stands for stomach. The point is located about four-finger space below the patella in the depression on the lateral side of the bone (tibia). ST36 is know to boost the immune system of the body and it is used for many symptoms like:

  • Bell’s Palsy
  • indigestion, stomach aches
  • limited range of motion or pain of lower extremities
  • headaches, migraines
  • heat and ache in bottom of the feet
  • mid back pain, tingling
  • sinus congestion
  • nose bleeding
  • ear infection
  • high blood pressure

You can personally use this point as an acupressure point by applying pressure to the point with your fingers for 9-10 seconds, 5-6 times a day.

LI11 - Qu Chi


These acupoints are just a few of the many points that can influence healing for the body. By stimulating these points on a weekly, bi-weekly, and/or monthly basis (dependent on how chronic issues are), symptoms can be overcome and the root cause of common patient problems are solved. In order to eliminate problems and proactively keep them from returning, we recommend a treatment cycle that lasts anywhere from 4-10 full visits. We also recommend consistent, monthly maintenance sessions after the initial plan of care is complete to ensure that the problem does not return. By incorporating Acupuncture into your health routine and staying proactive, your personal resilience (whether physical, mental, or emotional) will be built and sustained.

Do you suffer from any of the above symptoms? Have you been wanting to try Acupuncture? Allow our Acupuncturist to help you overcome nagging symptoms and provide you with the life-changing relief that you deserve.


Contact us today or visit our Acupuncture Page to learn more and book your first session!



References:

Wongmo, Jung. 한의틔움. Version 1.4, © WonmoJung. Apple App Store, https://itunes.apple.com/us/app//id463205887?mt=8